Review: See how the rest of the world lives, organized by income

Speaker: Anna Rosling Rönnlund
TED2017
Date: April 2017
Location: Vancouver, BC

Description from TED website:
What does it look like when someone in Sweden brushes their teeth or when someone in Rwanda makes their bed? Anna Rosling Rönnlund wants all of us to find out, so she sent photographers to 264 homes in 50 countries (and counting!) to document the stoves, beds, toilets, toys, and more in households from every income bracket around the world. See how families live in Latvia or Burkina Faso or Peru as Rosling Rönnlund explains the power of data visualization to help us better understand the world.

Select the image to go to the actual video.

My Review / Notes / Thoughts

Oh wow, this video really has me excited! It is PACKED with educational potential!

I attempted to find the website … and it had moved … so if you’d like to check it out for yourself, here it is! https://www.gapminder.org/dollar-street

Ok, so as I watched I was considering the fields of study that this video (and corresponding website) would work well with…. oh my the ideas!

  • Cultural / International Studies (a no-brainer, right?)
  • Data Analysis / Data Science – after all, this is a form of it
  • Political Science (especially international)
  • Psychology / Sociology / Anthropology
  • Business / Economics – a great comparison for incomes

I had more ideas but my brain started to hurt! What other fields of study can you see being able to leverage this video with?

Oh… I guess research fields … you could make assignments with this to actually participate in the study! From their about page:

Please help us find homes in your country! We need help in finding homes in countries that are not yet portrayed on Dollar Street, and in adding more homes from the countries we already have! We need support with lot of other things as well. If you want to help, please open the form below and fill it out so we can get an idea of how we can best work together! It shouldn't take more than a minute. Thanks!

https://www.gapminder.org/dollar-street/about

Wouldn’t that make for an interesting class project even? I can see it used in High Schools as well as College courses! Students could even learn to calculate the values (that info is on their about page).

Check it out! And let me know if you find a way to incorporate this into your classroom!


Until next time … live long, life-learner!

Review: What if we ended the injustice of bail?

Speaker: Robin Steinberg
TED2018
Date: April 2018
Location: Vancouver, BC

Description from TED website:
On any given night, more than 450,000 people in the United States are locked up in jail simply because they don’t have enough money to pay bail. The sums in question are often around $500: easy for some to pay, impossible for others. This has real human consequences — people lose jobs, homes, and lives, and it drives racial disparities in the legal system. Robin Steinberg has a bold idea to change this. In this powerful talk, she outlines the plan for The Bail Project — an unprecedented national revolving bail fund to fight mass incarceration. (This ambitious idea is part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)

Select the image to go to the actual video.

My Review / Notes / Thoughts

This is an amazing talk from someone who has worked inside the legal system for years. She and her husband started a fund to help bail people out of jail… to help people keep their jobs, homes, and families.

I believe that this would be an excellent talk to include in courses on Criminal Justice, Social Justice, Public Administration, and Political Studies to name a few. It would probably also work well in the Social Work studies realm.

Instructors could leverage this talk as a primer, then have students research the project she mentions or other similar projects and talk about the statistics she goes into, as well as advancements since this talk was released. They could compare it with other efforts in the US or around the globe. The students could write papers, post on discussion boards, or perhaps even have live “debates” on the topic (one side for the topic, the other against).

What do you think? How can you see leveraging this material in your courses?


Until next time … live long, life-learner!

Review: A love letter to realism in a time of grief

Speaker: Mark Pollock and Simone George
TED2018
Date: April 2018
Location: Vancouver, BX

Description from TED website:
When faced with life’s toughest circumstances, how should we respond: as an optimist, a realist, or something else? In an unforgettable talk, explorer Mark Pollock and human rights lawyer Simone George explore the tension between acceptance and hope in times of grief — and share the groundbreaking work they’re undertaking to cure paralysis.

Select the image to go to the actual video.

My Review / Notes / Thoughts

This is a very powerful message presenting in this talk. It is a story of resiliency and persistence, along with optimism and realism. How many people do you know who hit a roadblock in their life and they just stop and live there? Mark and Simone hit a major roadblock in their lives when Mark fell from a third-story window and was paralyzed from the waist down. If this was you or someone you loved, would you have just accepted it and tried to muddle through life however you could? Or would you follow Mark and Simone’s path through the raging waters of grief?

I believe this talk could be used in a multitude of ways, with a variety of fields of study. First-year students would benefit from the talk by learning about the power of resiliency and persistence. Students majoring in fields such as psychology and physical therapy can also benefit from this talk … learning how to temper hope so that people can hold on to that hope despite how long it might take for any improvements to occur … or despite any setbacks.

While a paper could be a way for students to process this talk, I think a discussion forum would be a much stronger method … as it would give students the opportunity to process their own thoughts as well as listen to and respond to their classmates’ thoughts.

What majors fields of study do you think this talk lends itself to? Do you see any other ways for incorporating this talk into your curriculum?


Until next time … live long, life-learner!

Review: Love, no matter what

Speaker: Andrew Solomon
TEDMED 2013
Date: April 2013
Location: Washington, DC

Description from TED website:
What is it like to raise a child who’s different from you in some fundamental way (like a prodigy, or a differently abled kid, or a criminal)? In this quietly moving talk, writer Andrew Solomon shares what he learned from talking to dozens of parents — asking them: What’s the line between unconditional love and unconditional acceptance?

Select the image to go to the actual video.

My Review / Notes / Thoughts

Personally, I am not sure how I feel about this talk. But despite my feelings, I do think this would be a good talk to spur engagement in the classroom, especially in the realm of psychology. Perhaps it would work well for discussions and debates as well. I’m sure this would also be an interesting piece for students studying in various fields of medicine to see how societal changes occur around illnesses.

Did you watch the video? Can you see utilizing this video in your classroom? How would you engage your students with this video? What type of assignment would you develop around it?


Until next time … live long, life-learner!

Review: What really matters at the end of life

Speaker: BJ Miller
TED2015
Date: March 2015
Location: Vancouver, BC

Description from TED website:
At the end of our lives, what do we most wish for? For many, it’s simply comfort, respect, love. BJ Miller is a hospice and palliative medicine physician who thinks deeply about how to create a dignified, graceful end of life for his patients. Take the time to savor this moving talk, which asks big questions about how we think on death and honor life.

Select the image to go to the actual video.

My Review / Notes / Thoughts

“[H]ealthcare was designed with diseases, not people, at its center.”

The purpose of his talk is to bring “design thinking” into the conversation of improving healthcare and the experience of dying.

Now you might think that due to his topic, that this talk is only for people in the healthcare industry. WRONG! This talk, while heavy, is relevant to people in a myriad of fields of study. He actually is encouraging others to come in and find ways to improve the quality of life!

Based on this, I can say that this is an excellent talk for a variety of disciplines of study. Students can watch this video and discuss with each other ways to apply their field of study to improve the quality of life. Even better, have them reflect in a paper and perhaps even find a project to work on towards this very fact.

What are your thoughts? How would you incorporate this talk into your curriculum?


Until next time … live long, life-learner!

Some products listed are affiliate links, and we may earn a small commission if you purchase those products. Dismiss

Exit mobile version